September 4, 2015

Dev Soufflé on Performance

By Andreas Fast

DevSnack #5: Google’s new logo, Phoenix on Elixir, scaling with a nomadic team, vim productivity and speeding up rails. A wide range of topics that converge in one: performance.

#1 – Google’s new logo is not about legibility?

Jack Self (@jack_self) analyses Google’s new logo and argues that the new font isn’t really about legibility but about austerity. He makes and interesting case about the recent global events and their effects on our psyche and it’s ultimate effects on tech and design.

#2 Phoenix, the framework for the modern web!

Chris McCord (@chris_mccord) introduces Phoenix 1.0. Phoenix is a web framework for Elixir. Elixir is an exciting new language that runs on the Erlang VM and leverages it’s incredible performance. Phoenix uses Channels to make real time communication on the web trivial. It’s at an early stage but it is a promising technology!

#3 Scaling ruby with a nomadic team at GitHub

Derrick Harris (@derrickharris) interviews Sam Lambert discussing how the service is able to keep on scaling with a relatively simple technology stack. He also talks about GitHub’s largely officeless workplace where about 60 percent of its employees work remotely.

#4 JSHint Vim plugin

I like to use vim for development and recently I joined a project where we have a bunch of node applications. So I spend my workday writing and editing a lot of Javascript. Everyone knows how shady Javascript can be and JSHint is a great tool that helps in writing better Javascript. Nikolay Frantsev (@shutnik) wrote this plugin that runs JSHint inside vim for Javascript files. If you like using another IDE I’m sure there’s some integration. The goal really is not to have to think about it, but having the feedback at your fingertips.

#5 Adequate Record

Aaron Patterson (@tenderlove) worked on AdequateRecord last year. It is now part of Rails, but it was a lot of “common sense” applied to Active Record. We can use his ideas for other parts of our projects I’m sure. And the most important lesson about improving performance: measure, apply change, measure. Without measuring you don’t really know what you are doing in terms of performance.


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